CurRent issues

Welcome to IJLERA! International Journal of Latest Engineering Research and Applications

Volume 06 - Issue 08 (August 2021)


Title:
Motivating Students Learning with Dynamic Modeling
Authors:
Dr. Shinemin Lin
Source:
International Journal of Latest Engineering Research and Applications, pp 01 - 10, Vol 06 - No. 08, 2021
Abstract:
Dr. Winkel, director of SIMIODE promotes using computer modeling to teach Differential Equations. Dr. Panoff, director of SHORDOR.COM promotes using computer modeling to unzipped student’s potential. I had a chance to attend both SIMIODE and SHORDOR workshops. I learned how to develop models that can be used in classroom and how to use models to teach classes. I used Dr. Winkel M and M model at all my classes. Different level students have different reports. I started using modeling to motivate student at all level classes. I used Dr. Panoff Have = Had + change model to inspire student working on undergraduate research in the topic of dynamic modeling of real-world cases. Since all students have different background. Dynamic modeling is the best way to encourage students working on interdisciplinary field. Differential Equations are the best way to describe the change of any phenomena. However differential equation is a spooky term for many students. If we use difference quotient that students learned in College Algebra to approximate derivative, then even lower-level students can enjoy differential equation models. This paper is based on my presentation at Joint Mathematics Meeting at Baltimore, MD in January 2019. At this paper, I will introduce some models that I used in my classes.
Keywords:
Dynamic Modeling, SIMIODE, SHORDOR, M and M model, Cinderella Model
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Title:
Effect of change width of CFRP sheet on dynamic response of slab reinforce with GFRP bars
Authors:
Eman H.Hamza, Mutaz K. Madlum
Source:
International Journal of Latest Engineering Research and Applications, pp 11 - 21, Vol 06 - No. 08, 2021
Abstract:
Reinforced concrete slabs general structural parts that may subjected to impact loads plus static loads. Reinforced concrete structures subjected to harsh environments and, because of the high corrosion, resistance of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) bars; used as a substitute for traditional steel. Up to failure, FRP bars behave in a linear-elastic manner without yielding (brittle behavior), which necessitates a solution. Recently, proposed external bonding of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) strips on the tension side of the slab to strengthen it. In this study, the number of CFRP strips, width, and their configuration explored. Five (1550×1550×150) mm concrete slabs support all four corners of each one with simple support and reinforce with Glass Fiber Reinforce Polymer (GFRP) bars casted. Five of them externally bonded with CFRP strips. All slabs tested under impact loads by dropping a 150kg mass from a height of 5m. Two accelerometers mounted on the dropped mass measure the impact load by using Newton's second law. Displacement-time, strain-time, reaction force-time, and acceleration-time explored and compared between slabs with various configurations. The results show that increasing the number of CFRP strips with less width on the tension side of the slab develops impact resistance better.
Keywords:
dynamic response, glass fibre reinforced polymer, CFRP strips, concrete slab, impact load.
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